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Daisy looking for love!

9 September 2015

A lovely young dog called Daisy, was presented to Will Robinson, one of Willows’ general practice vets earlier this year.

Daisy came to visit with the Love UnderDogs charity who had been looking after her for the last few weeks. They had noticed that after a moderate period of chasing the other young dogs at the rehoming centre she became quite lame and sore on her right hind limb. She was initially rested and given some anti-inflammatory painkillers, however this didn't improve things.

When she was examined she was found to have pain in her right knee (stifle) joint and Will decided that the best course of action would be to sedate Daisy and then take some x-rays (radiographs) of her right hind limb and her hips.

The x-rays showed that her hips and her left knee joint were ok but that she had a fracture affecting her right shin bone (tibia). This particular type of fracture is called a tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture. This can be seen by comparing the x-rays of her left and right knee joints.

 

A: Fracture of right shin bone (tibia) B: Radiograph of a normal left tibia

A: Fracture of right shin bone   
B: X-ray of a normal left shin bone

 

Post operative radiograph of the right leg with the pin and wire in place

Post operative x-ray of the right leg with the pin and wire in place

 

This type of fracture occurs relatively infrequently and is often seen in dogs between 4 and 8 months of age. The tibial tuberosity serves as the insertion site of the knee cap (patella) tendon. Occasionally the leg can be stabilised in a cast but more often than not internal fixation with implants is required. In Daisy’s case, a pin was driven across the fracture and secured in placed with a wire.

She made a marvellous recovery after surgery and is coping very well during a period of post operative confinement to prevent her damaging the surgical repair; this is not an easy task for a young energetic puppy.

The prognosis for a return to normal function is looking good for Daisy. When Daisy has fully recovered from her surgery she will be looking for love in her forever home.

 

Daisy on the road to a full recovery and enjoying her active life

Daisy on the road to a full recovery and enjoying her active life

Daisy on the road to a full recovery and enjoying her active life

Daisy on the road to a full recovery and enjoying her active life

Daisy on the road to a full recovery and enjoying her active life

 

If you would like to know more about the fantastic work done by Love Underdogs, and perhaps even make a donation of your own that will help to make a deserving dog's life happier, please visit: www.loveunderdogs.org

Love Underdogs