willows

Your login session has timed out.
Please login below.

Willows website uses cookies - by continuing to browse the website you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Further information

close willows alert cookies

Submit Case Report

Do you wish to submit this report?

Submit Case Report

Prior to submitting please preview the report using the Save and Preview button.

Use the browser back button to return.

Cancel Case Report Assignment

Are you sure you wish to cancel your assignment to report on this case – all inputted data will be lost!

Delete Case

Do you want to delete this case?

This site is optimised for modern web browsers, and does not fully support your browser version, we suggest the use of one of the following browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Microsoft Edge, some sections of the website may not work correctly such as web forms

Hip Op Hurray for Beau!

20 January 2016

Back in the summer, Beau, a beautiful young British shorthair was referred to Willows to see orthopaedic Specialist Jonathan Pink.

Beau was examined by his own vet as he was lame on his left hind leg and was showing no signs of improvement. Investigations by Beau’s usual vet revealed a complex condition called ‘capital physeal separation’. This is where the top of the femur (thighbone) comes away from the rest of the femur due to a fracture at the level of the growth plate (area of growing tissue in the bones of young animals). This type of injury can result from a minor trauma to the leg.

Understandably Beau’s owners were concerned about the long term function of his leg and came to see one of Willows orthopaedic Specialists, Jonathan.

Jonathan examined Beau and advised that the best option for Beau, to ensure good long term function of the leg would be a total hip replacement. Being a complex procedure and requiring specialist equipment, this type of surgery can only be performed in a referral centre by Specialist orthopaedic surgeons.

After careful consideration by Beau’s owners and with Jonathan’s guidance it was decided that this would be the best way forward for Beau. Beau was admitted that day for the first step, which is to ‘measure’ the patient for the prostheses. This required obtaining very specific X-rays (radiographs) of the hip and femur and placing them against line drawings (templates) of the various sizes of prostheses available.

At a later date Beau was admitted for surgery. He was anaesthetised and Jonathan along with a team of surgeons proceeded with the delicate surgery, which involved careful preparation of the hip socket and the top of the femur prior to the implant being fixed in position.

 

The surgical implants, forming the new ball and socket action of the affected hip.

The surgical implants, forming the new ball and socket action of the affected hip

 

After surgery Beau had radiographs taken to check the correct position of the implants.

 

Radiographs revealed the correct placement of the implants.

Radiographs revealed the correct placement of the implants

 

After an overnight stay receiving pain relief and supportive care, Beau was reunited with his very relieved owners. Beau was sent home under strict instructions to rest and was confined to cage rest for 8 weeks.

Beau has since been back to visit Jonathan for several check-ups and we are pleased to report that he has recovered very well from his surgery. He has no lameness and is able to walk, run, jump and enjoy life!

 

Beau relaxing on the sofa now he is allowed back on, after his strict confinement.

Beau relaxing on the sofa now he is allowed back on, after his strict confinement

 

Taking a gentle stroll in the garden after surgery.

Taking a gentle stroll in the garden after surgery

 

Playing hide and seek!

Playing hide and seek!

 

Further information about this specialist procedure can be seen on our Total Hip Replacement Surgery Pet Health information page.