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Great News for Henry!

29 July 2016

Lovely little Henry was just 8 months old when he suddenly started yelping out in pain when he was touched or when he was moving around.

His owners were understandably very concerned and took him to see their usual vets. Despite excellent care and strong pain relief, poor Henry did not improve. He was very painful around his lower spine and his symptoms were progressively becoming worse, he was not able to bear weight on one of his hind limbs, he had lost his appetite and his pain was uncontrollable.

Henry was referred to the neurology team at Willows. James Elford, one of our Neurology Clinicians, examined Henry. Due to his clinical symptoms and findings from his neurological examination, Henry was admitted to the hospital for an MRI of his spine, and further investigations including blood and urine samples. The MRI was performed by Willows’ Specialist imaging team and revealed a compression of the spinal cord. The results of the investigations and the clinical symptoms were consistent with a condition called discospondylitis.

 

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord

 

Discopondylitits (and the symptoms that are associated with it) are due to an infection process in the body and requires treatment with an extensive course of antibiotics for up to 12 weeks, combined with very restricted exercise.

After a short stay in the hospital Henry was delighted to be reunited with his owners. Once the antibiotics were on board and fighting the infection, Henry slowly started to feel much better. His owners were thrilled to update us that Henry is now feeling much better, regaining strength in his back legs and is back to his mischievous ways - and most importantly, has had no further relapses.

Here are some photos of gorgeous Henry

 

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.

 

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.

 

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.

 

MRI images, highlighting the compressive lesion that was squashing the spinal cord.